Press room

Ebook developer takes home $2,500 prize from Rakuten Kobo

The $2,500 grand prize in the second annual So You Think You Can Code (SYTYCC) ebook design competition, courtesy of prize sponsor Rakuten Kobo, has been awarded to Kristin Brodeur, Digital Associate Production Editor at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Print poetry sales grew by 79% in 2016

The number of print Poetry books sold in Canada in 2016 grew 79% over the previous year, the largest jump of any subject category in that timeframe. While this is largely due to the success of Canadian poet Rupi Kaur's debut collection, Milk and Honey, the subject has been seeing incremental gains over the last few years.

New studies dive into Canada's most popular book genres

This new research study from industry non-profit BookNet Canada, Deep Dive: The Mystery/Detective Book Buyer, digs deep into the sales trends and consumer habits of one of the biggest genres in Canada to find out how, why, and where Mystery readers buy books. 

Accessibility a growing priority for publishers of digital books

In 2015, 72% of Canadian publishers pointed to accessibility when citing the driving forces behind their digital publishing programs, according to a new report from BookNet Canada. That's a 17% increase over 2014, making it the second-most popular reason behind the need to increase sales.

ebookcraft's inaugural design competition has its first winner

ebookcraft's first-ever ebook design competition, So You Think You Can Code (SYTYCC), came to a close on March 31 when the 2016 grand prize winner was announced live to an excited crowd of conference attendees. Congratulations are due to Rebecca Springer, who took home the $2,500 cash prize courtesy of Rakuten Kobo, subscriptions to Adobe Creative Cloud and FlightDeck, and eternal nerd glory.